Captured: Art of the Commute

At work, there is a gallery show for our department called the "Art of the Commute." Below are my submissions:

At the Start by Jen Gallardo
An Empty Car
Blue, in need of Orange
The Ghosts of Midtown
Maybe Breakfast?
Exiting Last Leg

Essentially, my approach was to photograph the disparity between where I begin my commute and where my commute lands me. I begin in my neighborhood which is pretty calm and quiet (for the most part). Most days, I get to the station and I will find a seat on the train as I'm at the last stop on the A train (where it terminates and then begins to head back downtown).

In contrast, after about 30 minutes on the train or so, I end up at 59th Street Columbus Circle. This is a relatively large station on the west side and a big connection point in the morning. As such, there is always a lot of hustle and bustle and tons of people walking around. I used long exposures to show in one frame the multitude of movement and people that's happening at that time of day.

It's here where I start the second leg of my trip, waiting for a B or D train to take me to Rockefeller Center where the building I work in is currently located. The Rockefeller station it not as big but just as nearly populated as so many other commuter's trips terminate there. There is a network of office buildings connected underground so there are a lot of people in and around the station. The revolving doors in the station lead to the underground shops in the "Concourse" level where one can find breakfast and emergency dry cleaning and shoe shining, among other things.

Perhaps if the series could have been longer (we were limited to a certain number of photos), I would have considered taking a photo of my desk (where my commute officially ends) or perhaps even my bed (where my commute officially begins).

Captured: One Light Portraits of Anthony

My boyfriend Anthony is probably my greatest model. He is always ready and willing to stand by and let me take his portrait. Secretly, I think he enjoys being in front of the camera a tiny bit (even though he will never admit this). Below are some photos I captured of Anthony with a one light set up. The one light, besides ambient lighting, was a Canon flash unit that I shot through a softbox.

Anthony Test Portrait #1 by Jen Gallardo
Anthony Test Portrait #2 by Jen Gallardo
Anthony Test Portrait #3 by Jen Gallardo

Captured: Hazy Shade of Winter

Ice Shards

I was born in the summertime.  My ancestors lived in warm weather nearly year round.  This leads me to believe that I am not built for cold weather.  However, being born and raised in New York City, I've adapted to some cold.  I have learned how to layer up and prepare for most temperature ranges.  That said, the winter always takes me by surprise.  I always find myself saying "This winter MUST be colder than last year!" even though that's probably not at all true.

Instead of spending too much time complaining about the weather, I've decided to celebrate the beauty in the cold.  With my camera in tow, I've been wandering around the snowy city (and surrounding parts) ready to capture what fills some folks with joy, but just makes me wear tights under my jeans and long-sleeve tees under my dresses.

I found I do best when the weather is cold, the winds are still, and the scene is drenched in sunlight.  But I still desperately long for spring.  I'd love to wear a jacket and not a coat.  I would also very much enjoy not wearing double socks and being able to walk out of the house with wet hair without the fear of icicles developing at the ends of my curls.

So with baseball's spring training just around the corner, I've decided to share a set of photos dedicated to celebrating winter.  I'd like to think of this as a indefinite moratorium on winter, at least until this time next year.

Just the Geese and Me
Thawing in Chunks
No Time for a Picnic
Mounds of Snow
Snow Flurries

Captured: Farewell to Summer

I'll preface this post by saying that I'll try to post stuff somewhat more regularly. Well, I could post way more regularly, but then it would be a bunch of stream-of-consciousness-type gibberish that wouldn't really be worth reading anyway. So yeah, that's my excuse for taking FOREVER to post this.

Back on topic — this year, bidding summer adieu was a lot more difficult.  The summer of 2010 was full of beach days, music, movies, good food and great friends.  And while I had a great time, there are still things I didn't get a chance to do this summer (Visit Coney Island or Atlantic City — for outlet shopping, obviously! Drink copious amounts of homemade iced peppermint tea! Take swimming lessons!). However, I'll gladly take what I can get: roadtrip + rock climbing in Kentucky; pig roast + bioluminescent algae in Maryland; baseball, concerts and just truly awesome, terrific people in New York City.

The following is a photographic recap (in no particular order) of many of the things that made my summer pretty memorable this year!

Captured: Farmer's Market

I went to the Farmer's Market this morning (well, actually this afternoon) which happens to be right around the corner from my house.  I'm always captivated by the beautiful color combinations found in nature and today was no exception.  The prunes were particularly inspiring in their dusty indigo coloring mixed with touches of a yellow mustard color, bordering on gold leaf.  The vibrant pink of the flowers in the first photo also caught my eye.

Captured: Lemonade Stand

Lemonade Stand by Jen Gallardo (some rights reserved)

This weekend, I was running a slew of errands (if you call shopping errands…) on the Upper West Side of Manhattan. As I was walking across town on 86th Street, I spotted this scene. A young girl scout and her mother were selling lemonade and lemon tarts by the stoop of their building. Needless to say, the lemon tarts were delicious.

I love the smell of fixer in the morning!

In college, I took a black and white photography class. I have to say, it was a ton of fun. I remember developing my own film with pride (I even developed my friend's black and white headshots). I also remember the chemicals — stop, fixer, developer. Good times!

Adorama Learning Center has a run down of the supplies you would need to build your own darkroom. While I would love to have my own b&w darkroom, I don't think I have the space. I've heard stories of folks using their poorly ventilated and poorly lit bathrooms as darkrooms but I'm not sure if my boyfriend Anthony would appreciate the aroma of chemicals in our tub!