Magazines and Women

I'm a big fan of magazines. While I usually stick with fashion magazines, lately I've been reading some other more business oriented titles. This year, Anthony and I started our own company for our personal pursuits and I felt really lost throughout the process. So when I got the opportunity to redeem some points for magazine subscriptions, I decided to go with a few titles that would help me wrap my head around our business needs. I subscribed to Inc Magazine, Entrepreneur and Fast Company.

I've really enjoyed my subscription to Inc Magazine. I find their articles to be super informative and their interviews, like recent ones with execs from Tumblr and Kid Robot, to be truly inspiring. And, for what it's worth, I appreciate the attention to detail in the graphic layout of the pages themselves. I love that it's a happy marriage of helpful content and creative design. I also like that the magazine is not written for a particular gender. Women and men alike can pick it up and get something out of it. This is not to say that every magazine should do this, but it's nice that a magazine marketing towards small business owners does not discriminate.

Unfortunately, I can't say the same for Entrepreneur. Now, working in technology in various industries, I've realized it's a boy's club — not that that's entirely a bad thing! I've worked with some pretty talented men and learned a lot from them (most notably that the lack of women in their midst is mostly an oversight, not intentional). I also happen to like a lot of things men typically like more than most women (sports, fried foods, gadgets) so it doesn't really bother me to spend time in the company of dudes. Continue reading "Magazines and Women"

Captured: The Things We Carry

Last year, I was inspired by a photo project going around (as well as countless magazines I'd purchased) that showed the inner contents of a person's handbag. I think you can tell a lot about a person by what they carry with them day in and day out. As you can see above, those are the contents of my bag as of July 7th 2011, when this photo was taken.

It's quite a different spread compared to 2010:

The biggest difference to me is the cellphone. I've replaced the Blackberry Pearl and Black & Red notebook with an iPhone. It's funny to think that it's only been a year and yet having the iPhone has completely changed my way of life — for the better! Although, I'm still a fan of paper and have been known to carry around notebooks too. I still can't type fast enough on my iPhone to get the ideas out whereas with a notebook I can speed through them.

The other big difference is the lighting. The 2010 photo was making use of available light and as a result was not the right color temperature (thus why it's greyscale) and a bit underexposed. The 2011 photo is still a little darker than I would've liked, but made use of bounced Speedlight flash (I bounced off the ceiling) to illuminate the items and details therein. However, the lens I used for this year's photo is not as great in quality so I still feel it's a bit off. In addition, my current camera isn't as great about capturing low light as the camera I'd like to buy soon. So next year, it will be better!

The High Cost of a Low Price

Everyone (well, mostly everyone) knows that there's no such thing as a free lunch.

When it comes to low prices, I've learned the hard way that sometimes you get what you pay for.  The adage is true: if it looks too good to be true, it probably is.

I remember when I moved into my first real apartment post-college.  Unlike a lot of my peers, I had to pay for all of my initial expenses myself, with support from my boyfriend who I would be living with.  At the time, I worked for a nonprofit organization (for those that don't know, that's code for "not getting paid much") and he worked in theatre (also an industry where low salaries are not surprising).  This meant we had to get creative about how to spend money on furnishing an apartment.  Luckily, the apartment wasn't very large so there wasn't too much to buy.  We were also very fortunate that bed bugs were not widespread then; many of our furniture pieces then were found objects of unknown pedigree.

Though I tried very hard to find one on the street, nobody was getting rid of a pine wood antique chest of drawers like I desired for myself.  Some things just don't come easy.  Seeing no other way of affording a place to put my clothes, I ordered a filing cabinet made of particleboard that would happen to be large enough for my clothes and fit in our small bedroom.  For a short time, it did the job.  Until one morning, I was getting ready for work and the thing just crumbled.  If you can imagine a dresser imploding and collapsing upon itself, that's exactly what happened. Continue reading "The High Cost of a Low Price"

Captured: Hazy Shade of Winter

Ice Shards

I was born in the summertime.  My ancestors lived in warm weather nearly year round.  This leads me to believe that I am not built for cold weather.  However, being born and raised in New York City, I've adapted to some cold.  I have learned how to layer up and prepare for most temperature ranges.  That said, the winter always takes me by surprise.  I always find myself saying "This winter MUST be colder than last year!" even though that's probably not at all true.

Instead of spending too much time complaining about the weather, I've decided to celebrate the beauty in the cold.  With my camera in tow, I've been wandering around the snowy city (and surrounding parts) ready to capture what fills some folks with joy, but just makes me wear tights under my jeans and long-sleeve tees under my dresses.

I found I do best when the weather is cold, the winds are still, and the scene is drenched in sunlight.  But I still desperately long for spring.  I'd love to wear a jacket and not a coat.  I would also very much enjoy not wearing double socks and being able to walk out of the house with wet hair without the fear of icicles developing at the ends of my curls.

So with baseball's spring training just around the corner, I've decided to share a set of photos dedicated to celebrating winter.  I'd like to think of this as a indefinite moratorium on winter, at least until this time next year.

Just the Geese and Me
Slush
Thawing in Chunks
No Time for a Picnic
Stormy
Mounds of Snow
Snow Flurries

Mentorship in the Age of Instant-ity

Quite a few years ago, I had a conversation with a colleague about mentorship.  She mentioned that she didn't mind being a mentor but found it exhausting and often not worth her time.  Then, I was younger, looking for guidance and surprised by her thoughts.  Now, I understand her meaning.  Let me explain.

I believe information should be free and that knowledge is power.  Currently, we are in the age of "instant-ity"; you can get most information you need pretty easily from the convenience of your cellphone, laptop or even television.  Thus it appears that information is, for the most part, free and that you can wield power over your own existence through the knowledge you've obtained via this information.  But this is where the problem lies, and ultimately the disconnect between generations lately. Continue reading "Mentorship in the Age of Instant-ity"

Why The Beatles on iTunes is Important

Yesterday, Apple (Apple Computer, the company behind my beloved iPhone) changed their homepage to read that on Tuesday November 16th, a big announcement was coming from iTunes.  Over the years, Apple has made lots of big announcements but usually they are pretty easy to forecast.  For example, around "back to school" season, Apple usually has a music event where they'll release new iPods and refresh iTunes software.  This big announcement, in the middle of November, was not really in keeping with Apple's usual release cycle.  My first thought: The Beatles must be coming to iTunes.

The Beatles on iTunes
Screenshot of Apple.com announcement of Beatles on iTunes

And turns out, I was correct!  The Apple.com homepage changed to reveal that The Beatles have officially come to iTunes.  The new content available for purchase on iTunes now includes the fab four's 13 studio albums as well as video content (concerts, commercials, and etc).  As a big Beatles fan, I'm really happy to see their catalog added to iTunes; but truthfully, it's far more important than just making me happy.  A lot of folks on the internet (well, in my twitter-verse at least) are making noise about being somewhat disappointed by this announcement.  It's actually a really big deal for The Beatles' members and their estates, as well as a big deal for Apple Computer.  However, it's a much bigger deal for music history. Continue reading "Why The Beatles on iTunes is Important"

Captured: Farewell to Summer

I'll preface this post by saying that I'll try to post stuff somewhat more regularly. Well, I could post way more regularly, but then it would be a bunch of stream-of-consciousness-type gibberish that wouldn't really be worth reading anyway. So yeah, that's my excuse for taking FOREVER to post this.

Back on topic — this year, bidding summer adieu was a lot more difficult.  The summer of 2010 was full of beach days, music, movies, good food and great friends.  And while I had a great time, there are still things I didn't get a chance to do this summer (Visit Coney Island or Atlantic City — for outlet shopping, obviously! Drink copious amounts of homemade iced peppermint tea! Take swimming lessons!). However, I'll gladly take what I can get: roadtrip + rock climbing in Kentucky; pig roast + bioluminescent algae in Maryland; baseball, concerts and just truly awesome, terrific people in New York City.

The following is a photographic recap (in no particular order) of many of the things that made my summer pretty memorable this year!

Photoshop v. Illustrator (or: who cares?)

Lately, I've been hearing a lot of chatter about which tools web professionals should use and why. I'd like to begin by saying that I've never been one to drone on about tools. My perspective is you need to choose the right tool for the job. How do you ascertain which tool is the right one? The right tool is the one that does the job.

Let's take an example from the painting world: Bob Ross. I remember being a small kid, watching Bob Ross create beautiful paintings on PBS. Later, I re-watched those programs and found that he was not using a fancy set of expensive brushes. But rather, he was using a standard painter's brush — something most people own or can easily and cheaply find at their local hardware store. In 30 minutes at a time, using a big bushy brush, he created some pretty great work and a following of folks who suddenly realized that painting was accessible to them. Continue reading "Photoshop v. Illustrator (or: who cares?)"

Captured: Farmer's Market

I went to the Farmer's Market this morning (well, actually this afternoon) which happens to be right around the corner from my house.  I'm always captivated by the beautiful color combinations found in nature and today was no exception.  The prunes were particularly inspiring in their dusty indigo coloring mixed with touches of a yellow mustard color, bordering on gold leaf.  The vibrant pink of the flowers in the first photo also caught my eye.